Pronunciation and meaning of `mutatis mutandis’?

First, let’s deal with the pronunciation. The `u’ in both words is pronounced like the `oo’ in `cool’, `pool’, and `fool’, and the final `i’ is like the `i’ in `hip’, `dip’, and `ship’. The `a’ in the second syllable of `mutatis’ is like the `a’ in `ask’, `path’, and `task’; while the `a’ in `mutandis’ is like the `a’ in `ant’, `pants’, and `stand’. The main stress is on the second syllable of `mutandis’. This is just one of the ways of pronouncing the word.

`Mutatis mutandis’ is a Latin expression frequently used in economics and law. Its literal meaning is “things being changed that have to be changed”. This can be interpreted to mean “the necessary changes having been made”. For example, if you were to say, “The same agreement will, mutatis mutandis, be given to each manager in the organisation,” what you mean is that the agreement that will be given to each manager will be more or less the same. The only change will be the name – each agreement will contain the name of a different manager.

Source: ‘Know Your English’ ( The Hindu) – November 20, 2007

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