‘leave someone up in the air’

When you leave someone up in the air, you leave the person waiting for a decision. You don’t tell him whether it’s a `yes’ or a `no’.

Examples:  ”What do you mean you haven’t taken a decision about my promotion? How long do you plan to leave me up in the air like this?”  * “The Vice Chancellor said that he hadn’t taken a decision about the demands. He left the students up in the air.”  * ”Don’t leave me up in the air like this.”

Source: S. Upendran, The Hindu ‘Know Your English’ Series, January 30, 2006

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