What is the difference between `eat like a horse’ and `eat like a pig’?

 Horses and pigs are known to have good appetites. Therefore when you say that someone eats like a horse or a pig, what you are implying is that the individual consumes a lot of food. Careful users of the language maintain a subtle distinction between the two expressions. When you say that someone eats like a pig, it has a negative connotation. Pigs are supposed to be rather noisy eaters. They slurp, grunt, and drool when they eat. I am sure other animals do the same thing, but unfortunately for the pig, it is always associated with these things. Therefore when you say, `He eats like a pig’, what you mean is that he eats a lot, and has very bad table manners.

Source: The Hindu ‘Know Your English’ Series, December 12, 2005

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s